Tuesday, 26 November 2013

Review: Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human (1998) by Harold Bloom

Harold Bloom

Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human

Riverhead Books, Paperback, [1998].
8vo. xx+745 pp.

Contents:

Chronology
To the Reader
Shakespeare’s Universalism

I. The Early Comedies
1. The Comedy of Errors
2. The Taming of the Shrew
3. The Two Gentlemen of Verona

II. The First Histories
4. Henry VI
5. King John
6. Richard III

III. The Apprentice Tragedies
7. Titus Andronicus
8. Romeo and Juliet
9. Julius Caesar

IV. The High Comedies
10. Love’s Labour’s Lost
11. A Midsummer Night’s Dream
12. The Merchant of Venice
13. Much Ado About Nothing
14. As You Like It
15. Twelfth Night

V. The Major Histories
16. Richard II
17. Henry IV
18. The Merry Wives of Windsor
19. Henry V

VI. The “Problem Plays”
20. Troilus and Cressida
21. All’s Well That Ends Well
22. Measure for Measure

VII. The Great Tragedies
23. Hamlet
24. Othello
25. King Lear
26. Macbeth
27. Antony and Cleopatra

VIII. Tragic Epilogue
28. Coriolanus
29. Timon of Athens

IX. The Late Romances
30. Pericles
31. Cymbeline
32. The Winter’s Tale
33. The Tempest
34. Henry VIII
35. The Two Noble Kinsmen

Coda: The Shakespearean Difference
A Word at the End: Foregrounding

========================================================

This book leaves me in the same state as Iago’s intrigues leave Othello: perplexed in the extreme. Here and there, it does contain nuggets of insightful and illuminating criticism, many of which are likely to change my next reading of certain plays and even, perhaps, improve my appreciation of Shakespeare’s genius. But such flashes of brilliance are not easy to notice. They are drowned in Mr Bloom’s overweening attitude, overblown Bardolatry, repetitious writing, sweeping comparisons and confused argumentation.

First of all, let me admit that I have not read the whole book. Since I have never understood the unfortunately widespread practice of reading criticism before the works that inspired it, I have perused only about a half of Mr Bloom’s volume. I understand this is enough to dismiss the following paragraphs as irrelevant, but for what it’s worth, here is a bunch of random reflections. It is not accidental that I deal first and mostly with the book’s defects. They first leap to mind. They are more numerous than its merits.

The author professes himself to follow in the footsteps of the great Shakespearean critics from the past, from Dr Johnson and Hazlitt a couple of centuries ago to A. C. Bradley and Harold Goddard in the first half of the last century. Mr Bloom shares with Goddard an aggravated form of Bardolatry, as serious a disease as any form of idolatry, but that’s just about all they share. The significant difference is that Goddard’s deification of the Bard is a great deal more subtle and better argued. From what I’ve read of Johnson’s famous Preface to Shakespeare (1765) and Hazlitt’s Characters in Shakespear’s Plays (1817), Mr Bloom is not in their league either. Indeed, the tone and the content of The Invention of the Human, both every bit as preposterously adulatory as its title, are a far cry from the sane, wholesome and judicious criticism of Dr Johnson and William Hazlitt. Those critical voices from the past are far from perfect; but they are classics. It remains to be seen whether the hype around Mr Bloom’s magnum opus will in time develop into classical status. 

(In the beginning of his chapter on Othello, Mr Bloom quotes a long excerpt from Hazlitt’s analysis of Iago’s character. It is embarrassingly superior to the messy medley of confused thoughts and bizarre parallels that follows. Hazlitt, much like Goddard a century later but in a very different way, wrote marvellous prose: lucid, direct, personal, engaging, provocative, witty. It is a joy to read and a pleasure to disagree.)

To begin with, Mr Bloom’s central argument is, for me, confusing. Though he does discuss it at length in his muddled introductory and concluding chapters, “Shakespeare’s Universalism” and “Coda: The Shakespearean Difference” respectively, and mentions it numerous times throughout the book, I am still at sea what exactly he means by “the invention of the human”. If he wants to say that Shakespeare affected profoundly the depiction of character in all post-Shakespearean literature, his thesis is a sweeping but rather ordinary generalization, dubiously supported by the Bard’s mind-numbing popularity. But if he means that Shakespeare laid the Renaissance foundations of human nature on which the Western consciousness has been modelled ever since, he is going way too far in asserting something that receives no support whatsoever from history. He implies both at different places, but the latter seems to predominate. Time and again does Mr Bloom repeat that Shakespeare is the centre of the Western canon, namely that everything before him, from the drama of ancient Greece and the Bible to Chaucer and Marlowe, was merely a prelude to the Bard’s all-encompassing and all-transforming genius – and everything after him, from Milton, Dickens, Melville and Dostoyevsky to Nietzsche, Freud, Proust, Joyce and Cormac McCarthy, was one huge letdown, an endless list of mediocrities who pathetically tried to say what Will had said with unsurpassed perfection. To my mind, all this is just silly.

Mr Bloom’s Bardolatry is truly exhausting. It is his constant harping on Shakespeare’s divinity, more than anything else, that makes the book hard to digest in quantity. I reckon he must have a giant statue of Will at home. He probably prays to it at least five times a day and offers human sacrifices at least once a week. He frankly informs us that he cannot imagine any state of mind when approaching the Bard but awe. I cannot imagine a worse one. When I approach a great author, I certainly do so with respect. But I want to be in full possession of my faculties. Reverence is quite out of place. Even the greatest writers have written some rubbish in their (usually) long and prolific careers. Even the greatest writers were humans, after all; and human beings are fallible, imperfect creatures. But Shakespeare, of course, was no human. He was divine and, if not infallible, certainly the least fallible of all artists who ever inhabited the Western civilisation. So Mr Bloom thinks. I wonder why he didn’t give his book the much more appropriate title “The Creation of the Human”.

Much praise has been lavished on the clarity and accessibility of Mr Bloom’s style, especially on his refusal to use the ponderous and pretentious cadences usually adored by the critics. Well, I am not impressed. Mr Bloom’s vocabulary is not without some curious favourites. He is quite fond, for example, of vague adjectives like “rancid” and its derivative noun “rancidity” or scientific terms like “ontological” and “cognitive”. And what is the meaning of the verb “perspectivize”? Presumably, it means “to put into perspective”. Fancy words like these are apt to give Mr Bloom’s style a slightly pompous air. Worst of all, they often obscure his meaning. That he uses them rather promiscuously – “Shakespeare’s generous rancidity”, “Elsinore’s rancid court”, “the splendidly rancid triad [of characters in certain plays]”; “ontological shock”, “ontological splendor”, “ontological dignity”, “ontological devastation”, “ontological instinct”, “ontological identity”, “ontological reality”; “cognitive power”, “cognitive urgency”, “cognitive zest”, etc. – doesn’t help the matter.

Neither are many of Mr Bloom’s bold conclusions terribly stimulating. He seldom argues them, and then not very convincingly. He usually states them and we are supposed to accept them on his authority. This won’t do. The situation is particularly dismal in the general chapters when the author reflects on human nature and how Shakespeare molded it. What is one to make of passages like these?

Our ability to laugh at ourselves as readily as we do at others owes much to Falstaff, the cause of wit in others as well as being witty in himself. To cause wit in others, you must learn how to be laughed at, how to absorb it, and finally how to triumph over it, in high good humor.

Before Hamlet taught us how not to have faith either in language or in ourselves, being human was much simpler for us but also rather less interesting. Shakespeare, through Hamlet, has made us skeptics in our relationships with anyone, because we have learned to doubt articulateness in the realm of affection.

I don’t mind that Mr Bloom is strenuously opinionated and magnificently arrogant. But I do mind his flimsy argumentation in cases like these. First of all, the “ability to laugh at ourselves as readily as we do at others” is extremely rare; if it were not, the world would be a better place. I am not sure if Hamlet’s almost pathologically intellectual make-up would be beneficial if widespread enough, but that hardly changes the fact that it is not. Our species is still ruled by passions and seldom appreciates jokes at its own expense. If Shakespeare is supposed to have changed that, he evidently failed. Either way, I really don’t see how we can hold him responsible.

Passages like the above are the definition of the disapproving phrase “sweeping generalization”. These abound even in the separate chapters about the plays which, on the whole, are greatly superior to Mr Bloom’s rambling, repetitious and superficial general reflections. I don’t know how many times I’ve read that Shylock and Richard III are parodies of Marlowe’s Barabas or that so-and-so character or play is the “most remarkable,” “most persuasive”, “unique”, etc. in the Western canon. It really is tedious. As for Mr Bloom’s absurd fixation with the characters of Hamlet (who “vies with King David and the Jesus of Mark as a charismatic-of charismatics”) and Falstaff (“the charismatic genius”), it is already legendary. (And obviously derivatives of “charisma” are another fetish much loved by the author.) In nearly every chapter, if not indeed on nearly every page, he indulges in worthless panegyrics and futile speculations, entirely lost in hero worship of epic proportions. It’s an amusing spectacle. But it won’t bear a re-reading.

Provocative statements about certain plays or characters that baffle rather than stimulate the imagination are legion. It is striking how breezily misguided, not to say downright inane, Mr Bloom can sometimes be. Just two examples that impressed me in this respect:

One would have to be blind, deaf, and dumb not to recognize that Shakespeare's grand, equivocal comedy The Merchant of Venice is nevertheless a profoundly anti-Semitic work. Yet every time I have taught the play, many of my most sensitive and intelligent students become very unhappy when I begin with that observation. Nor do they accept my statements that Shylock is a comic villain and that Portia would cease to be sympathetic if Shylock were allowed to be a figure of overwhelming pathos.

[…]

Auden, in one of his most puzzling critical essays, found in Iago the apotheosis of the practical joker, which I find explicable only by realizing that Auden's Iago was Verdi's (that is, Boito's), just as Auden's Falstaff was operatic, rather than dramatic. One should not try to restrict Iago's genius; he is a great artist, and no joker.

It’s a little high-handed to claim that “Auden’s Iago was Verdi’s”. All Auden actually said in “The Joker in the Pack” is that Iago’s “I am not what I am” is given its “proper explanation” in Boito’s “Credo” in Act 2 of Verdi’s music drama. This doesn’t necessarily mean that he considered the character in operatic terms (as he did Falstaff and said so). I think Mr Bloom completely misunderstood the whole essay. Auden took a good deal of space to explain carefully the rather complex nature of the practical joker, and I am pretty certain he would have denied Iago neither his genius nor his great artistry. Least of all did Auden try to restrict him.

The case of The Merchant is a great deal more complex. I quite agree with the logically impeccable conclusion that if Shylock is “a figure of overwhelming pathos” then Portia loses much of her appeal: that’s precisely my chief problem with the play. But I do not, on the whole, consider the work anti-Semitic – or if it is, it is at least as much anti-Christian, which makes strict labels hard to attach. Mr Bloom appears to be quite confused himself. He insists that this is comedy, but he keeps using the apt adjective “equivocal”; that it is Portia’s play, not Shylock’s, but in his reflections he is much more occupied with the Jew than with the mistress of Belmont; that the play is made incoherent by portraying Shylock as too sympathetic a victim, and yet he is fully aware that there is an “extraordinary energy” in his poetry and prose that “palpably is in excess of the play’s comic requirements”. In the end, ironically, Mr Bloom undermines his own case by lavishing nearly all of his attention on Shylock. I also wonder if his anti-Semitic offense doesn’t have something to do with his Jewish background and upbringing.   

Last and least, on factual level a number of Mr Bloom’s claims are outrageously unsupported; sometimes he admits that, but more often he doesn’t. One should be very careful. For example, he states that that the Ur-Hamlet was written by Shakespeare himself and that Marlowe was murdered “by the government” with such confidence as if we had massive historical evidence about both. But do we? He at least has the decency to add that the Ur-Hamlet idea was originally Peter Alexander’s and that the scholars in general disagree with it. Except in such rare cases, one should take Mr Bloom’s historical facts with a solid pinch of salt. He is not very fond of footnotes either and he sometimes refers to other opinions in a rather cryptic way.

The chief merit of Mr Bloom’s Big Book, as I see it, is his iconoclastic approach to modern Shakespearean criticism and staging. Remarks like “Hamlet has survived everything, even Peter Brook“ and the modern “School of Resentment criticism of Shakespeare” are refreshingly cool. He has no patience with critics who try to reduce Shakespeare merely to a fortuitous product of his times, let alone with those who inflict their own fantasies (feminist, Marxist, whatever) on his works. He is equally scathing about modernist staging, and here again I concur completely. The opening paragraph of the chapter about The Tempest may serve as an example of Mr Bloom’s polemical best combined with his not unappealing sense of humour:

Of all Shakespeare's plays, the two visionary comedies – A Midsummer Night's Dream and The Tempest – these days share the sad distinction of being the worst interpreted and performed. Erotomania possesses the critics and directors of the Dream, while ideology drives the bespoilers of The Tempest. Caliban, a poignant but cowardly (and murderous) half-human creature (his father a sea devil, whether fish or amphibian), has become an African-Caribbean heroic Freedom Fighter. This is not even a weak misreading; anyone who arrives at that view is simply not interested in reading the play at all. Marxists, multiculturalists, feminists, nouveau historicists – the usual suspects – know their causes but not Shakespeare's plays.

Insights into certain plays and characters are the second best thing about Mr Bloom’s mighty book. Sadly, as I’ve said in the beginning, these are relatively few and rather hard to find. Certainly, they don’t lie in the author’s almost maniacal proclivity for comparisons with other writers, most notably Chaucer, Milton, Nietzsche and Freud, but also with just about anybody else. I admit this may be my own mistake, for Mr Bloom assumes his readers will be more widely read than I am, but I am still inclined to view such instances as the weakest form of criticism. At one place, or rather in many places in one chapter, he makes several ingenious comparisons between Milton’s Paradise Lost and Othello which, for a change, are explained for beginners, but why they matter to the prospective reader is still mysterious to me. Similar parallels, when I find them intelligible at all, usually reflect the character of the whole book: fascinating but far-fetched, ultimately of some use as mild entertainment only.

But I was about to say something about Mr Bloom’s penetrating analysis of Shakespeare’s characters. It’s hard to concentrate on that. See what I mean by “defects leaping first”? So let’s stop here.

Sunday, 24 November 2013

Review: The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2001), eds. Michael Dobson and Stanley Wells


The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare

Edited by Michael Dobson and Stanley Wells

Oxford University Press, Hardback, 2001.
4to. xxix+541 pp. Preface by the editors, April 2001 [vii-viii].

First published, 2001.

Contents:

Preface
Acknowledgements
Contributors
Thematic listing of entries
List of plays
Note to the reader

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare

The British Isles and Frances in the English Histories and Macbeth
The royal family in Shakespeare’s English Histories
Shakespeare’s life, works and reception: a partial chronology
Further reading

Picture acknowledgements

========================================================

Very valuable but unfortunately prejudiced resource

Browsing this book fills me with mixed feelings. On the positive side, it is remarkably comprehensive for a single volume of less than 600 pages. On the other hand, there are certain perfunctory treatments, and even certain omissions, which strongly smack of foolish academic prejudice.

Good things first. All of Shakespeare's works are very well-covered. Textual problems, sources, synopsis, artistic features, critical and performance history, even short section about screen versions are provided in each and every case. Numerous other issues related to Shakespeare also enjoy concise, well-written and informative entries. Examples include the authorship controversy, various social issues (law, education, etc.) during Shakespeare's time and what use he made of them, history of reception and performance in countless countries (from Russia to Brazil), historical background as regards Elizabethan England (especially an extensive discussion of the theatrical world), biographical sketches of actors, actresses, directors and critics and who not involved with Shakespeare (from Burbage and Garrick to Olivier and Gielgud, from Dryden and Johnson to Shaw and Auden) and many, many more. Browsing the volume is exhilarating and educational.

Many of these entries do look too short and superficial, and some areas are not as comprehensive as they might have been. But that is to be expected, and it is not one of the reasons for my (slight but certain) disappointment with the volume. To take a musical example, there is not even the shortest entry on Liszt, so the reader is never told about his fine symphonic poem Hamlet. However, Verdi, Berlioz and Tchaikovsky enjoy information-packed columns full of fascinating and rather obscure historical details as do Shakespeare-inspired works in the fields of opera and ballet. To take a literary example, despite many omissions, there are discussions of the major scholarly editions of Shakespeare's work (Penguin, Arden, Cambridge, Oxford), their history and their significance. Notably, each entry is signed with the initials of its contributor.

It is worth noting that the book is richly illustrated with everything from rare photos of obscure actresses to reproductions of original documents, and it contains a perfectly dosed amount of amusing trivia. Sometimes these two aspects are ingeniously combined. One of my greatest favourites is a Ford advertisement from 1964 titled “Seven characters in search of seven cars”. This is simply hilarious. Imagine Prospero driving a Ford Cortina or Benedick satisfying himself with something “smart and snappy – the Anglia.” Few things convince me better in Will’s universal appeal. Even the automobile industry cannot resist him. The whole “advertising” entry is deliciously funny.

Considering Shakespeare's unprecedented popularity and enormous impact on just about everything, it is of course quite impossible to collect everything about him in a single volume. With that in mind, I think the small army of contributors have done an excellent job. The writing can sometimes be a little dry and dull, but it is always clear and precise. It is often opinionated, but it is virtually never obnoxious. I am not going to discuss my disagreement with specific opinions expressed in this book. This seems like a childish nitpicking. Diversity of opinion, at least in art and within reasonable limits, should be encouraged, not disparaged. But I do object to some inexplicable omissions and to the extremely superficial treatment of some inclusions.

For example, why is there no entry on Isaac Asimov and his Guide to Shakespeare? His impressive discussion of the historical and mythological background of the plays certainly deserves to be mentioned. Amazingly enough, even Harold Bloom is snubbed; his Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human is speedily dismissed as "every bit as hyperbolic and bardolatrous as its title suggests" and something that "cannot be recommended". I have read only small parts of Mr Bloom's magnum opus and they strike me as singularly uneven. But that's a matter of taste and highly irrelevant in this case. The outstanding popular success of his book warrants more than a casual mention in any companion to Shakespeare. The same goes for Asimov's volume which is still in print and relatively widely read.

(I wonder if Bill Bryson and his excellent Shakespeare: The World as a Stage in the Eminent Lives series would have been mentioned at all had the Companion been published after it. I am at least pleased to note that W. H. Auden – who is generally skipped by Shakespearean scholars – does have an entry. He and his essays are even mentioned in the discussions and bibliographies of Othello, The Merchant of Venice and The Tempest. So they should be.)

If these can pass "merely" for academic prejudices against popular writers, hardly something untypical in the rarefied circles of academia, the omission of Harold Goddard is downright baffling. He was an academic and his idiosyncratic yet compelling 1951 study of Shakespeare's oeuvre (The Meaning of Shakespeare, now available in two paperback volumes) is well worth the time of everybody seriously interested in the Bard. Bernard Shaw's controversial attitude is discussed in some detail, but the definitive collection of his Shakespearean criticism (Shaw on Shakespeare, 1961, ed. Edwin Wilson) is never mentioned.

In general, the treatment of some notable scholars and critics – or just "popular" writers – could have been more extensive. And the "Further Reading" is so short and superficial that it is just not serious. It goes without saying that the literature on Shakespeare is vast and well-nigh impossible to be encompassed. But that's why one reads this kind of multi-scholar reference books: to benefit from the experience and the insight of as many and as eminent scholars as possible. And yet – and despite the short (and without annotations) bibliographies in the end of many entries – the companion leaves something to be desired as far as further reading is concerned.

The most shocking and shameful treatment of great scholar I have discovered so far is that of G. B. Harrison. It is so perfunctory that it can be quoted in full:

Harrison, George Bagshawe (1894-1991), English academic. Author of Shakespeare: The Man and his Stage (1923), and Shakespeare under Elizabeth (1933), which speculates on the black prostitute Lucy Negro as a possible Dark Lady. His widely diffused Penguin editions of each play (1937-59) were based on the Folio text, but with only limited annotation.

G. B. H. deserves so much more than that. He wrote at least two other books – Introducing Shakespeare (1939, rev. ed. 1954) and Shakespeare's Tragedies (1951) – which should be on the to-be-read list of every Shakespearean neophyte. He also edited an impressive collection of contemporary writings, England in Shakespeare's Day (1928) that offers a vivid picture of Elizabethan England. Mr Harrison was extremely well-versed in the period and his historical background is often illuminating.

It is true that his Penguin editions – which can nowadays be found in the Penguin Popular Classics series – are not the most lavishly annotated, but neither are they valueless on this account. In fact, Mr Harrison edited Shakespeare's Complete Works (first published as a single volume in 1952) and this single-volume edition contains much more extensive annotations as well as a good deal of informative and perceptive essays about the works and their historical background, all written in a clear, lively, witty, engaging and insightful style.

To dismiss a Shakespearean scholar of Mr Harrison's accomplishment with so miserable an entry as the one quoted above is simply crass. I wonder how many other similar examples, which I unfortunately cannot notice, are contained within this book. It's a disturbing issue to contemplate.

Although this kind of book has been made largely superfluous by the Internet, The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare is still very much worth having – especially if you don't always have the opportunity to be online. It is a treasure trove to dip into with pleasure and profit while exploring the Bard. But please keep in mind that it is not always fair and reliable, the impressive array of scholarly contributors and (usually) the deceptively impartial writing notwithstanding. At least several notable writers on Shakespeare suffer from perfunctory and misleading treatment, or are completely omitted.

Tuesday, 19 November 2013

Bertrand Russell: A Very Short Bibliography [Section IV.19-36.]

Introduction and Contents

IV. THE COLLECTED PAPERS OF BERTRAND RUSSELL [cont.]

         IV.19.    Volume 19. Science and Civilization, 1931–33. Planned!
                  IV.20.    Volume 20. Fascism and Other Depression Legacies, 1933–34. Planned!
                  IV.21.    Volume 21. How to Keep the Peace: The Pacifist Dilemma, 1935–38, eds. Andrew G. Bone and Michael D. Stevenson.
                                                     i.  London and New York: Routledge, 2008.
                                                   ii.  Contents:
Part I. Uncertain Prospects for Peace
·      1 On Isolationism [1935]
·      2 Profits and War [1935]
·      3 Hitler’s Thirteen Points [1935]
·      4 Dangers in the Far East [1935]
·      5 Pitfalls in Security Pacts [1935]
·      6 The British Labour Party and Hitler [1935]
·      7 If You Were Foreign Minister What Would You Do about Abyssinia? [1935]
·      8 The Home Office, the Labour Party and Air Raid Precautions [1935]
a.   Your Duty in the Next War
b.   Air Raid Precautions
c.    How to Keep the Peace
·      9 How Not to Fight Fascism [1935]
·      10 Bertrand Russell Applauds U.S. Neutrality Decision [1935]
·      11 Keep out of War! [1935]
·      12 The New Alliance [1935]
·      13 The Dangers of Bluff [1935]
·      14 How to Keep Peace [1935]
·      15 In Lands Where Slums and Wars Are Unknown [1935]
·      16 Some Psychological Difficulties of Pacifism in War-Time [1935]
·      17 Socialism and the Planned State (Fabian Society Lecture) [1935–36]
a.   Lecture Outline [1935]
b.   The Prospects of Great Britain: Plan or No Plan [1936]
c.    The Prospects of a Permanent Peace [1936]
·      18 Peace and the World [1936]
Part II. Diarist for “The New Statesman and Nation”
·      19 A Weekly Diary (1) [1935]
·      20 A Weekly Diary (2) [1935]
·      21 A Weekly Diary (3) [1935]
·      22 A Weekly Diary (4) [1935]
·      23 A Weekly Diary (5) [1935]
Part III. Ideology and Politics
·      24 Fear of Freedom [1935]
·      25 Why Be Afraid of Socialism? [1935]
·      26 The Case for Socialism [1935, I.30.]
·      27 Why Radicals Are Apt to Be Unpopular [1936]
·      28 An Obituary of Liberalism [1936]
·      29 Dictatorships That Pass in the Night [1936]
·      30 Your Liberty Is in Danger [1936]
·      31 Blurb for Rudolf Rocker, Nationalism and Culture [1937]
·      32 Two Prophets [1937]
·      33 Power, Ancient and Modern [1937]
·      34 Political Democracy [1937]
·      35 The Superior Virtue of the Oppressed [1937]
Part IV. On Reason, Cruelty and Conscience
·      36 The Causes of Happiness [1935]
·      37 Preface to In Praise of Idleness [1935]
·      38 Western Civilization [1935, I.30.]
·      39 Intolerance, Past and Present [1935]
·      40 Individual and Social Morality [1935]
·      41 Do We Survive Death? [1936]
·      42 Greetings on Our Jubilee [1936]
·      43 Is Reason “Cold”? [1936]
·      44 The Established Church and the Report of the Archbishops’ Commission [1936]
·      45 Our Brave Impatient World! [1936]
·      46 Is Human Life Considered More Sacred Than Formerly? [1936]
·      47 Man Who Stuck Pins in His Wife [1936]
·      48 Auto-Obituary [1936]
·      49 Is Brutality Increasing? [1936]
·      50 On Violence in Thought and Feeling [1937?]
·      51 On Being Modern-minded [1937]
·      52 Law and Conscience [1937]
·      53 Anti-Semitism and Nazi Germany [1937–38]
a.   Answers to Questions [1937]
b.   The Persecution of the Jews [1938]
·      54 Byron and the Modern World [1938]
·      55 What Is Happiness? [1938]
Part V. Science and Society
·      56 Science Is Tottering [1935]
·      57 Storms and Tempests [1936]
·      58 Blurb for Lancelot Hogben, Mathematics for the Million [1936]
·      59 Reply to Mr. Gorer [1936]
·      60 Chemistry’s Power of Life and Death [1937]
·      61 The Fairly Modern Mind [1937]
·      62 War in the Heavens [1937]
·      63 Two Reviews of E.T. Bell, Men of Mathematics [1937]
a.   Lives of the Great Mathematicians (I)
b.   Lives of the Great Mathematicians (II)
·      64 “Whither Britain?” (Fabian Society Lecture) [1937]
a.   Lecture Outline
b.   Science and Social Institutions
Part VI. Education Theory and Practice
·      65 Academic and Professional Freedom [1935]
·      66 Lucy Martin Donnelly [1936]
·      67 The Future of State Education [1936]
·      68 Education for Democracy [1937]
·      69 Examinations [1937]
·      70 Education and Industry [1937]
·      71 Bringing up Parents (and Teachers) [1938]
·      72 What We Should Teach Our Children [1938]
Part VII. Parenting, Marriage and Sex
·      73 The Break-up of the Home [1935?]
·      74 On Divorce [1935]
·      75 A Debate with G.K. Chesterton [1935]
a.   That Parents are Unfitted by Nature to Bring Up Their Own Children
b.   Who Should Bring Up Our Children?
·      76 On Equal Pay for Equal Work [1935]
·      77 The Amberley Papers: Origins and Authorship [1935–37]
a.   Lord and Lady Amberley [1935]
b.   The Amberley Papers (I) [1937]
c.    The Amberley Papers (II) [1937]
·      78 On Wife-Beating [1935]
·      79 Rational Sexual Ethics [1936]
·      80 Dangerous Passions [1936]
·      81 Life Begins at Two [1936]
·      82 Is the Family Still a Vital Part of Modern Life? [1937]
·      83 Review of Blum, Marriage [1937]
a.   Marriage Reform in France
b.   Blum on Marriage
·      84 My Son, at 15 Months, Knows 150 Words [1938]
Part VIII. Pacifism versus Collective Security
·      85 British Foreign Policy [1936]
·      86 Spain’s Civil War [1936]
·      87 A Turning-Point in Foreign Policy [1936]
·      88 Blurb for, and Review of, Freda Utley, Japan’s Feet of Clay [1936]
a.   Freda Utley, Japan’s Feet of Clay
b.   Far Eastern Imperialism
·      89 Critical Responses to Which Way to Peace? [1936–37, see I.32.]
a.   Logic of the Pacifist Case [1936]
b.   Which Way to Peace? (I) [1936]
c.    Which Way to Peace? (II) [1937]
d.   Pacifism or Collective Security? A Reply [1937]
·      90 The Paralysis of England [1936]
·      91 “No Continental Entanglements” [1936]
·      92 What 1937 Will Bring [1936]
·      93 Methodism and Armament Firms [1937]
·      94 Christianity and the Church [1937]
·      95 Collective “Security” [1937]
·      96 Russell’s Maiden Speech in the House of Lords [1937]
a.   Prepared Speech
b.   Foreign Affairs
·      97 Humanizing Warfare [1937]
·      98 A World of Fairy Tales [1937]
·      99 The Crisis in Foreign Policy [1938]
·      100 Has the League a Future? [1938]
Appendixes
Interviews
·      I. Good Adults – Not Good Children [1935]
·      II. What’s What in War; Steel, Says Russell [1935]
·      III. War to Grip America, Says Savant Russell [1935]
·      IV. An Interview with Bertrand Russell [1935]
·      V. Peace and the Price to be Paid [1938]
Multiple-Signatory Texts
·      VI. No Passport [1935]
·      VII. Precautions for Air Raids [1935]
·      VIII. The University Labour Federation [1935]
·      IX. Mental Disorders [1935]
·      X. British Institute of Philosophy [1935]
·      XI. Foreword to What Was His Crime? The Case of Carl von Ossietzky [1936]
·      XII. The L.C.C. and a Film [1937]
·      XIII. Arts Peace Campaign [1938]
Miscellaneous Shorter Writings
·      XIV. Notes for Three Articles [1937?]
·      XV. Notes on War and Film [1938?]
                  IV.22.    Volume 22. The CCNY Case, 1938–40. Planned!
                  IV.23.    Volume 23. The Problems of Democracy, 1941–44. Planned!
                  IV.24.    Volume 24. Civilization and the Bomb, 1944–47, ed. Kenneth Blackwell.
                                                     i.  In Progress!
                                                   ii.  Contents:
Part I. Autobiography and Biography
·     1 The Most Unforgettable Character I Ever Met [1944?]
·     2 Eminent Men I Have Known [1944?]
·     3 Ten of My Favourite Books [1945]
·     4 [Statement on Using His Title] [1945]
·     5 H. G. Wells – the Man as I Knew Him [1946, I.46.]
Part II. Values and Education
·     6 What Makes a Woman a Fascinator? [1944]
·     7 A Waste of Public Money [1944]
·     8 Proposal for a Free Rational Thought Club [1945]
·     9 Democracy and Ability in Education [1945]
·     10 Make Divorce Easier [1945]
·     11 The Value of Philosophy [1945]
·     12 Is the Child the Father of the Man? [1945]
·     13 Ideas That Have Harmed Mankind [1946, II.69.]
·     14 Ideas That Have Helped Mankind [1946, II.68.]
·     15 A Plea for Clear Thinking [1947]
·     16 Blurb for Puzzled People [1947]
·     17 Blurb for Curry, Education for Sanity [1947]
·     18 Blurb for Burns, The First Europe [1947]
Part III. Science and Democracy
·     19 Should Scientists Be Public Servants? [1945]
·     20 What Is Democracy? [1946]
·     21 Should a Scientist Be Free to Tell? [1946]
·     22 Blurb for Popper, The Open Society [1946]
·     23 What Is Democracy? [1946?]
·     24 Review of Hudson and Richens, The New Genetics in the Soviet Union [1946]
·     25 A Scientist’s Plea for Democracy [1947]
·     26 Science and Democracy [1947]
·     27 The Taming of Power [1947]
Part IV. Britain, the Empire and Anglo-American Relations
·     28 Can Americans and Britons Be Friends? [1944]
·     29 How War Has Changed the British People [1944]
·     30 I Am Thankful for the B.B.C. [1944]
·     31 BritainU.S.A. [1944]
·     32 Some Impressions of America [1944]
·     33 The Twilight of the British Empire [1944]
·     34 The Future in India [1944]
·     35 British and American Nationalism [1945]
·     36 Where Do We Go Now? [1945]
·     37 Future of India [1945]
·     38 Election Survey [1945]
·     39 Should We Abolish the House of Lords? [1947]
Part V. War’s End in Germany and the Far East
·     40 Can We Re-Educate Germany? [1945]
·     41 Democracy in Liberated Europe [1945]
·     42 The Future in China and Japan [1945]
·     43 A Philosophy for Reconstruction [1945]
·     44 What the European Victory Means to China [1945]
·     45 The Problem of Cruelty [1945]
·     46 Hopes and Fears for Tomorrow [1945]
·     47–48 Mass Deportations [1945]
·     49 Letter on Russian Deportations [1945]
·     50 Food Parcels Still Needed [1945]
·     51 The German Disaster [1945]
·     52 Situation in Central Europe [1945]
·     53 What Should Now Be Our Policy towards Germany? [1946]
·     54 German Recovery: a European Interest [1947]
Part VI. The Soviet Union, World Government and the Atomic Bomb
·     55 The Atomic Bomb [1945]
·     56 Review of Koestler, The Yogi and the Commissar [1945]
·     57 What Should Be British Policy towards Russia? [1945]
·     58 How to Avoid the Atomic War [1945]
·     59 Peace or Atomization? [1945]
·     60 Letter on Appeasing Russia [1945]
·     61 What America Could Do with the Atomic Bomb [1945]
a.   What America Could Do with the Atomic Bomb
b.   Bertrand Russell Offers an Escape from Destruction
·     62 Britain and the Atomic Bomb [1945]
·     63 The International Situation [1945]
·     64 How I Would Win the Peace [1946]
·     65 The Atomic Bomb and the Prevention of War [1946]
·     66 [Pax Sovietica vs. Pax Americana] [1947]
·     67 The Outlook for Mankind [1947]
·     68 Preface to the German Edition of Power [1947]
·     69 [Atomic Energy Control] [1947]
·     70 International Government [1948]
·     71 Survival in the Atomic Age [1947]
a.   Survival in the Atomic Age
b.   Still Time for Good Sense
·     72 The International Bearings of Atomic Warfare [1948]
·     73 The Future of Mankind [1948]
Appendices
·     I. Contributions to the B.B.C. Brains Trust Programmes [1944]
·     II. An Interview with Russell [1944]
·     III. A World Worth Living in for All Peoples [1944]
·     IV. Bertrand Russell Demands Release of Indian Leaders [1945]
·     V. Starvation in Europe [1945]
·     VI. Starvation in Europe [1945]
·     VII. Bertrand Russell [1945]
·     VIII. Filosofiens värde [1945]
·     IX. Memorial to the Prime Minister [1946]
·     X. Famine and Disease in Hungary [1946]
·     XI. Food Supplies [1946]
·     XII. Bertrand Russell on the Future of Mankind [1946]
·     XIII. Food for Europe [1946]
·     XIV. Draft for a Petition [1946]
·     XV. Bread Rationing [1946]
·     XVI. Religious Freedom on the BBC [1946]
·     XVII. United Europe Movement [1947]
·     XVIII. Arrests in China [1947]
·     XIX. Conditions of Peace [1947]
·     XX. “It’s Later Than We Think” [1947]
·     XXI. Revisions to The Scientific Outlook [1947]
·     XXII. A Moscow Report of a Lecture [1947]
·     XXIII. Deserters from the Forces [1947]
·     XXIV. Control of Atomic Energy [1947]
                  IV.25.    Volume 25. Defence of the West, 1948–50, ed. Kenneth Blackwell.
                                                     i.  In Progress!
                                                   ii.  Contents:
Part I. Autobiography and Biography
·     1 A Turning-Point in My Life [1948]
·     2 What Life Has Taught Me [1948]
·     3 Conrad’s Place and Rank in English Letters [1949]
·     4 George Bernard Shaw [1949]
·     5 Bertrand Russell Writes for the Daily Graphic on the Life of His Mind [1949]
·     6–8 George Orwell and 1984 [1950, I.46.]
a.   6 Nineteen Eighty-Four
b.   7 Book of the Year
c.    8 George Orwell
·     9 The Key to Culbertson [1950]
Part II. Values and Education
·     10 Culture and the State [1948]
·     11 The Magus [1948]
·     12 Why Fanaticism Brings Defeat [1948]
·     13 Bertrand Russell’s “Reith Lectures” [1949]
·     14 Sixty Seconds for God [1949]
·     15 The General Conference of Unesco [1949]
·     16 What Will Future Ages Think of Our Own? [1950]
·     17–18 Punishment and Crime [1950]
a.   17 The Problem of Punishment
b.   18 Crime and the Community
Part III. Science and Society
·     19 Science as a Product of Western Europe [1948]
·     20 Science and Civilization [1948]
·     21 Can a Scientific Society Be Stable? [1949]
·     22 The Next Fifty Years (1) [1950]
·     23 The Next Fifty Years (2) [1950]
·     24 The Good and Harm That Science Can Do [1950]
·     25 The Science to Save Us from Science [1950]
·     26 Light and Shade of Fifty Years [1950]
Part IV. Problems of Democracy
·     27 Preface to Third Eidition of Roads to Freedom [I.13.]
·     28 Democracy and Foreign Policy [1948]
·     29 Public Opinion Polls [1948]
·     30 How to Promote Initiative [1948]
·     31 Freedom – at the Price of Freedoms [1949]
·     32 L’Individu et l’Etat Moderne [1950]
·     33 Is Popular Democracy Adapted to the Problems of 1950?
·     34 Can We Afford to Keep Open Minds? [1950]
Part V. Britain and Anglo-American Relations
·     35–37 Ideas and Beliefs of the Victorians
·     35 A Period of Dread and Doubt [1948]
·     36 Toleration [1948]
·     37 John Stuart Mill [1948]
·     38 The American Mentality [1949]
·     39 You and Tomorrow [1949]
·     40 The Political and Cultural Influence of U.S.A. [1949]
Part VI. European Problems
·     41 Review of Burns, The First Europe [1948]
·     42 Comments on the Report of the Cultural Committee of the Congress of Europe, The Hague, May 1948
·     43 A Philosopher Gone Astray [1948]
·     44 European Culture [1948]
·     45 Interview on Berlin Radio [1948]
·     46 The Future of Europe [1949]
·     47 Unity of Western Culture [1949]
·     48 Germany’s Generals—Justice or Vengeance? [1949]
·     49 From Bertrand Russell [1949]
·     50 Ten Years After [1949]
·     51 Ernst von Weizsaecker [1949]
Part VII. Marxism and the Soviet Union
·     52 The Marxist Poison [1948]
a.   52a The Marxist Poison
b.   52b BBC Version of “The Marxist Poison”
·     53 Prefatory Note to Second Edition of The Practice and Theory of Bolshevism [I.15.]
·     54–55 Utley, Lost Illusion [1948]
a.   54 Blurb for Utley, Lost Illusion
b.   55 Introduction to Utley, Lost Illusion
·     56 First Sign of Decay [1949]
·     57 Soviet Enslavement of the Intellect] [1949]
·     58 Stalin Declares War on Science [1949]
·     59 What I Would Say to Stalin [1949]
·     60–62 Professor Bernal [1949]
·     63–64 On The God That Failed [1950]
a.   63 What Went Wrong
b.   64 The Intellectual Error of Communism
Part VIII. The Atomic Bomb and World Government
·     65 Atomic Energy Control and Its International Bearings [1948]
·     66 The Outlook for Mankind [1948]
·     67 The International Situation [1948]
·     68 The Prevention of War [1948]
·     69 World Government [1948]
·     70 Replies to Questions in Last Chance [1948]
·     71–72 Westminster School Speech [1948–49]
·     71 Atomic Energy and the Problems of Europe
·     72 Resisting Russia
·     73 Values in the Atomic Age [1949]
·     74 Is Regional Association the Most Practical Step toward World Government? [1949]
·     75 Towards a New Loyalty [1949]
·     76 The Bomb: Can Disaster be Averted? [1949]
·     77 Problems of the Atomic Bomb [1949]
·     78 The International Control of Atomic Energy [1949]
·     79 Danger of a Thermonuclear Arms Race [1949]
·     80 Is a World State Still Possible? [1950]
·     81 Is a Third World War Inevitable? [1950]
Appendices
·     I Contributions to the B.B.C. “Brains Trust” Programme [1948–50]
·     II The Fat Ration [1948]
·     III Divorce Law Reform [1948]
·     IV Bertrand Russell and the Atom Bomb [1948]
·     V Dangerous Radical Russell Wants to Arm against Soviet Union [1948]
·     VI Det internationella läget [1948]
·     VII Det marxistiska giftet [1948]
·     VIII Förebyggandet av krig [1948]
·     IX Western European Union—the Next Step [1948]
·     X Letter to Walter W. Marseille [1948]
·     XI Rejoinder to “A Philosopher Gone Astray” [1948]
·     XII The German Generals [1948]
·     XIII Response to Arnost Kolman [1948]
·     XIV Earl Russell Denies Atom War Reports [1948]
·     XV Marriage and Divorce [1949]
·     XVI A Memorial to Goethe [1949]
·     XVII Divorce Reform [1949]
·     XVIII Lord Russell’s Warning [1949]
·     XIX Professor Bernal [1949]
·     XX University Professors [1950]
·     XXI Conscience [1950]
·     XXII Preface to Unpopular Essays
·     XXIII 1950 Revisions to An Outline of Intellectual Rubbish
·     XXIV Pocket Diary and Earnings [1948–50]
                  IV.26.    Volume 26. Respectability – At Last, 1950–51, eds. Andrew G. Bone and Michael D. Stevenson.
                                                     i.  In Progress!
                                                   ii.  Contents:
Part I. Australian Lectures and Essays
·     1 Guest of Honour [1950]
·     2 The World as I See It [1950]
·     3 Ferment in Asia [1950]
·     4 My Philosophy of Life [1950]
·     5 We and U.S. Can Lead and Help Asian People [1950]
·     6 What Hope for Man [1950]
·     7 Obstacles to World Government [1950]
·     8 Science Can Help Australia Support More People [1950]
·     9 Bertrand Russell Tells Us What Communism Is [1950]
·     10 Private Monopoly Is Bane of Capitalism [1950]
·     11 Living in the Atomic Age [1950]
a.   I. Institutions [1950]
b.   II. Individuals [1950]
·     12 Greater Democracy Is Socialism’s Purpose [1950]
·     13 Land with a Future for Ambitious Youth [1950]
·     14 My Impressions of Australia [1950]
·     15 Happy Australia [1950]
Part II. Reason, Freedom and Happiness: Prognoses and Prescriptions
·     16 What Desires are Politically Important [1950]
·     17 Loquacious Man and His Mind [1950]
·     18 To Replace Our Fears with Hope [1950]
·     19 Three Letters as President of the Mountaineering Association [1951]
a.   Mountaineering [1951]
b.   Mountaineering Courses [1951]
c.    Way Up [1952]
·     20 Are These Moral Codes Out of Date? [1951]
·     21 The Use of Books [1950]
·     22 Christianity and Science. Is there a Gulf? [1951]
·     23 Are Human Beings Necessary? [1951]
·     24 Sex Education Is Desirable [1951]
·     25 The Future of Happiness [1951]
·     26 L’Avenir de la Science [1951]
·     27 Prof. Gilbert Murray Honoured [1951]
·     28 [Denies Categorization as a “Humanist”] [1951]
·     29 My Faith in the Future [1951]
·     30 A Liberal Decalogue [1951]
·     31 British Philosopher Calls for Development of New Beliefs to Fit Techniques [1951]
·     32 The Road to Happiness [1952, I.46.]
Part III. Taking Stock of the Cold War
·     33 If We Are to Survive this Dark Time – [1950]
·     34 On Nationalism [1950]
·     35 My Plan for Peace [1951]
·     36 [What Does the Single Individual Signify?] [1951]
·     37 Soviet Humour – Does It Exist? [1951]
·     38 Lord Russell and the Atom Bomb [1951]
·     39 Could We Do More to Secure Human Rights? [1951]
·     40 Living in an Atomic Age [1951]
·     41 China and History [1951]
·     42 Competition and Co-operation in Politics and Economics [1951]
·     43 The Narrow Line [1951]
·     44 Every Crisis an Opportunity [195?]
·     45 Communism and Christian Socialism [195?]
·     46 Why Defend the Free World? [1951]
·     47 Dictatorship Breeds Corruption [1951]
·     48 Preface to A World Apart [1951]
·     49 How Fanatics are Made [1952]
·     50 How Near Is War? [1952]
·     51 One World – Is it Feasible? [1952]
Part IV. Hopes and Fears as Regards America
·     52 On Mass Hysteria [1951]
·     53 Why American Is Losing Her Allies [1951]
·     54 “What Can I Do?” [1951]
·     55 Lord Russell Sees M’Arthur Dismissal As “Act of Courage” [1951]
·     56 What’s Wrong with Anglo-American Relations [1951]
·     57 Using Beelzebub to Cast Out Satan [1951]
·     58 Bertrand Russell and the U.S.A. [1952]
·     59 Bertrand Russell and the U.S. [1952]
·     60 Is America in the Grip of Hysteria? [1952]
Part V. Miscellaneous
·     61 How I Write [1951, I.46.]
·     62 Bertrand Russell: Biographical Notes [1951]
·     63 The Corsican Ordeal of Miss X [1951, I.42.]
·     64 [Celebrity Status] [1951]
·     65 Future of the B.B.C. [1952]
·     66 Leonardo’s Day – And Our Own [1952]
Appendixes
Interviews
·     I Australian Interviews [message]
a.   1 Bertrand Russell Sends a Message to Australia [1950]
b.   2 Philosopher Bertrand Russell Lives in No Ivory Tower [1950]
c.    3 Lord Russell Here on Tour [1950]
d.   4 Lord Russell: An Old Man with a Young Mind [1950]
e.   5 Fireside Chat with an Eminent Philosopher [1950]
f.      6 Bertrand Russell Thinks Russia Will Go to War, and—World War 3 Will Last Ten Years [1950]
g.   7 Bertrand Russell Talks on Women [1950]
h.    8 Recipe for a Happy Life [1950]
i.      9 Mankind May Survive, But— [1950]
j.      10 Quit Asia Advice by Russell [1950]
·     II American Interviews: 1950 [advocate]
a.   1 Russell Advocates Education Under International System [1950]
b.   2 “U.S. and Russia Control Thought”, Claims B. Russell [1950]
c.    3 [“But”] [1950]
d.   4 Bertrand Russell Pictures Britain As Satellite of U.S., Favours Red Deal [1950]
e.   5 Draw Line, West Advised [1950]
f.      6 “Never Too Late for Maturity” [1950]
g.   7 New York Close-Up [1950]
·     III Notebook [1950]
·     IV Notebook [1950]
·     V I Quit, Says Earl Russell to a Cambridge Club [1950]
·     VI Happy? Of Course, Says the Earl [1950]
·     VII Early Years Important to Lord Russell [1951]
·     VIII Baron Finds Answers to World’s Problems from Britain’s Greatest Thinker [1951]
·     IX American Interviews: 1951 [loss]
a.   1 Bertrand Russell Here, Expects Labour Loss, but Few Changes [1951]
b.   2 [Chess, Etc.] [1951]
c.    3 [Poetry] [1951]
d.   4 Russell Discusses British Elections, Foreign Policy [1951]
e.   5 Britons Freer Than We Are, Says Russell [1951]
f.      6 Don’t Force Opinions on Pupils, Says Russell [1951]
g.   7 Philosopher Slaps American Attitude Toward Education [1951]
h.    8 Rapier Minded Peer Gives Concise Reply to Queries in Personal Interview Backstage [1951]
·     X [Travelling] [1951]
·     XI The Next World War [1952]
Multiple-Signatory Texts
·     XII Foreword [1950]
·     XIII Understanding With Germany [1951]
·     XIV Mountain Risks [1951]
                  IV.27.    Volume 27: Culture and the Cold War, 1952–53, eds. Andrew G. Bone and Michael D. Stevenson.
                                                     i.  In Progress!
                                                   ii.  Contents:
Part I. Russell at Eighty
·     1 Advice to Those Who Want to Attain Eighty [1952]
·     2 Meanderings of an Octogenarian [1952]
·     3 Reflections on My Eightieth Birthday [1952]
·     4 Tribute to a Great Man [1952]
·     5 My First Eighty Years [1952]
·     6 An Octogenarian’s Retrospect and Prospect [1952]
·     7 Adaptation: An Autobiographical Epitome [1956, I.46.]
Part II. Portraits from Memory and Other Biographical Essays
·     8 J.M. Keynes and Lytton Strachey [1952]
·     9 [D.H. Lawrence] [1952, I.46.]
·     10 Sydney and Beatrice Webb [1952, I. 46.]
·     11 Portraits From Memory – III [1952, I.46.?]
·     12 Max Beerbohm [1952]
·     13 Two Papers on Gandhi [1952]
a.   The Medieval Mind of Gandhi [1952]
b.   Mahatma Gandhi [1952, III.12.]
·     14 Some Cambridge Dons of the ’Nineties [1953, I.46.]
·     15 Some of My Contemporaries at Cambridge [1953, I.46.]
·     16 George Bernard Shaw [1953, I.46]
·     17 H.G. Wells [1953, I.46.]
·     18 Joseph Conrad [1953, I. 46.]
Part III. Fiction and Other Creative Writing
·     19 The Infra-Redioscope [1953, I.42.]
·     20 The Good Citizen’s Alphabet [1953]
·     21 “G” Is for Gobbledegook [1953]
·     22 1953 in Retrospect [1953]
·     23 Benefit of Clergy [1953, I.42.]
·     24 The Prelate and the Commissar [1953]
·     25 Mr. Bowdler’s Family Bliss [1953]
·     26 Professor Mmaa’s Lecture [1953]
Part IV. BBC Radio Discussions and Interviews
·     27 Academic Freedom in America and Britain [1952]
·     28 Asian Club [1952]
·     29 Press Conference [1952]
·     30 Bertrand Russell Weighs the Chances of War [1952]
·     31 Europe and Asia and the Modern World [1952]
·     32 Personal Call [1953]
·     33 The Experience of Age [1952]
·     34 The Turn of the Year – Predicaments of Philosophy, Science and Art [1952]
·     35 [Interview on Short Stories] [1953]
·     36 Is Tyranny Self-Destructive? [1953]
·     37 Is There a Pattern in History? [1953]
Part V. Education and Enlightenment
·     38 Why Americans are Unhappy [1952]
·     39 [Goodwill Message] [1952]
·     40 Progressive Education [1952]
·     41 Possibilities of Happiness [1952]
·     42 Educational Prospects [1953]
·     43 Generation X [1953]
·     44 Education for a Difficult World [1953]
·     45 Are the World’s Troubles Due to Decay of Faith? [1956, II.89.]
·     46 The Kinsey Report on Women [1953]
·     47 The World I Should Like to Live In [1953]
Part VI. Freedom, Democracy and Dictatorship: A Critical Defence of the West
·     48 What Is Freedom? [1952, II.78.]
·     49 Western Values [1952]
·     50 Western Freedom [1953]
·     51 A Historian’s Political Philosophy [1953]
·     52 The Evidence of Dr. Marie C. Stopes [1953]
·     53 World Without Persecution [1953]
·     54 Obeying Law in Testifying [1953]
·     55 Ideologies and Power Politics [1953]
·     56 Voice of Freedom [1953]
·     57 Can Totalitarian Régimes be Stable? [1953]
·     58 What Is Democracy? [1953, II.79.]
Part VII. The Death of Stalin and Other Cold War Concerns
·     59 Three Essentials for a Stable World [1952]
·     60 Britain Can Lead Europe to Equality with America [1952]
·     61 The End of a Revolution [1952]
·     62 If There is War War Wins It [1952]
·     63 Broadcast to India [1953]
·     64 Stalin’s Legacy [1953]
·     65 A New Russian Policy? [1953]
·     66 The Greatest Present Service to Mankind [1953]
·     67 British Guiana [1953]
a.   British Guiana (I)
b.   British Guiana (II)
·     68 Bertrand Russell and “Preventive War” [1953]
·     69 Spot Letter from Earl Russell, OM [1953]
Appendixes
Interviews
·     I. Bertrand Russell Cross-Examined on Role of the Press in the Cold War [1952]
·     II. U.S. Politicos Trod Primrose Path, Says Earl [1952]
·     III. Off the Record [1952]
·     IV. The Wise Old Man Tells the World [1952]
·     V. At Eightya Highly Respected Rebel [1952]
·     VI. If I Were You Young Man [1952]
·     VII. The Lyons Den [1952]
·     VIII. [Writing Short Stories] [1952]
·     IX. [New Hope for Our World] [1953]
·     X. No Pills for PEP! [1953]
·     XI. [Monopolies] [1953]
Multiple-Signatory Texts
·     XII. Religious Broadcasting [1952]
·     XIII. Napalm Bombs [1952]
·     XIV. Racial Discrimination [1952]
·     XV. Homosexuality Laws [1952]
·     XVI. Sentence on an African [1953]
·     XVII. Plea to N.A.T.O. Leaders [1953]
Notes and Drafts
·     XVIII. [Writing Fiction] [1953]
·     XIX. Celebrity [1953]
              IV.28.    Volume 28. Man’s Peril, 1954-55, ed. Andrew G. Bone.
                                                     i.  London: Routledge, 2003.
                                                   ii.  Contents:
Part I. Implications of the Hydrogen Bomb
·      1 The Danger to Mankind [1954]
·      2 Atomic Energy and the Future of the World [1954]
·      3 Atomic Weapons [1954]
·      4 Scientific Warfare [1954]
a.   T.V.--Tuesday, 13 April
b.   The Hydrogen Bomb
·      5 Where Do We Go from Here? [1954]
·      6 The Hydrogen Bomb and World Government [1954]
·      7 My Plan for the Most Hopeful Road to Peace [1954]
·      8 Reflections on the Re-Awakening East [1954]
·      9 The Morality of "Hydrogen" Politics [1954]
·      10 The Road to World Government [1954]
·      11 Comment on Harrison Brown's Challenge of Man's Future [1954]
·      12 Two Papers on India [1954]
a.   What India Can Do For Mankind
b.   What India Can Do For the World
·      13 1948 Russell vs. 1954 Russell [1954]
·      14 What Neutrals Can Do to Save the World [1954]
·      15 Communism and War [1954]
·      16 Man's Peril [1954, II.85.]
Part II. Autobiographical, Biographical, Historical and Commendatory Writings
·      17 Sir Stanley Unwin [1954]
·      18 Tribute to Einstein [1954]
·      19 Trotsky in the Ascendant [1954]
·      20 Bernard Shaw [1954]
·      21 How I Write [1954. I.46.]
·      22 History as an Art [1954, II.84]
·      23 Men of Genius [1954]
·      24 On Reading His Own Obituary [1955]
·      25 Three Autobiographical Broadcasts [1955, I.46.]
a.   Experiences of a Pacifist in the First World War
b.   From Logic to Politics
c.    Hopes: Realized and Disappointed
·      26 Soviet Russia in Historical Perspective [1955]
·      27 Two Literary Blurbs [1954-55]
a.   Joan Henry, Yield to the Night [1954]
b.   Otto Larsen, Nightmare of the Innocents [1955]
Part III. Liberty, Morality, Religion and Other Prognoses and Prescriptions
·      28 Have Liberal Ideals a Future? [1954]
·      29 Suspicion [1954]
·      30 The Next Twenty-five Years in Britain [1954]
·      31 Homosexuality as a Crime [1954]
·      32 Secrets of Happiness [1954]
a.   You and Your Family
b.   You and Your Work
c.    You and Your Leisure
d.   You and the State
·      33 Can the Censor Promote Virtue? [1954]
·      34 Was the Human Race Happier a Few Centuries Ago Than Now? [1954]
·      35 Birth Control and World Problems [1954]
·      36 The World in 2000 A.D. [1954-55]
a.   Where Will Britain Stand in 2000 A.D.? [1955]
b.   Men and Women in 2000 A.D. [1954]
c.    Education in 2000 A.D. [1955]
d.   The State in 2000 A.D. [1955]
·      37 Can Religion Cure Our Troubles? [1955, II.83.]
·      38 Message to the Indian Rationalist Association [1955]
·      39 Message to the Conference on Cultural Freedom in Asia [1955]
·      40 Religion and Morality [1955]
a.   Christianity and Morals
b.   Religion and the Training of the Young
Part IV. Roads to Peace
·      41 New Year Message, 1955, to the Swiss People [1955]
·      42 A Statement for the New Year [1955]
·      43 Policy and the Hydrogen Bomb [1955]
·      44 War and the Hydrogen Bomb [1955]
·      45 Two Letters on the Chinese Offshore Islands Crisis [1955]
a.   a Peril in the East
b.   Letter "Not Sent" to The Manchester Guardian
·      46 Could Britain Fight? [1955]
·      47 Letter to the Daily Worker [1955]
·      48 Strategy and the Hydrogen Bomb [1955]
·      49 India Can Save the World [1955]
·      50 Can Permanent Peace be Achieved and How? [1955]
·      51 Can Man Survive? [1955]
·      52 Children of Hiroshima [1955]
·      53 The Road to Peace (I) [1955]
·      54 On Banning the Hydrogen Bomb [1955]
·      55 The Choice Is Ours [1955]
·      56 Steps towards Peace [1955, I.46.]
·      57 The Russell-Einstein Manifesto [1955]
a.   Notice of Press Conference on Russell-Einstein Manifesto
b.   Abbreviated Statement for the Press
c.    Letter to Heads of State
d.   The Russell-Einstein Manifesto
e.   Press Conference by the Earl Russell at Caxton Hall, Westminster on Saturday, 9th July, 1955
·      58 What Can Be Hoped from the Big-Four Conference [1955]
·      59 World Conference of Scientists [1955]
a.   Move by World Parliamentarians
b.   Speech for Conference of Scientists
c.    Statement on the Conference Resolution
·      60 The Road to Peace (II) [1955]
·      61 International Press Conference [1955]
a.   Why Governments Should Renounce War
b.   Atomic Energy
·      62 How to Consolidate Peace [1955]
Appendixes
Part I. Interviews
·      I. The Bomb: Where Do We Go From Here? [1954]
·      II. Russell the Rebel [1954]
·      III. The Wisest Man in the World Knows the Secret of Happiness [1954]
·      IV. Good Humour, Happiness, Whimsy of the "Voltaire of Our Time" [1954]
·      V. Bertrand Russell Says Peace Now Depends on Wisdom [1954]
·      VI. What Is Happening to the English Language? [1955]
·      VII. A Task for the Neutrals? [1955]
·      VIII. Tea with Russell [1955]
·      IX. See It Now [1955]
Part II. Multiple-Signatory Texts
·      X. International Studies [1954]
·      XI. Declaration of Atlantic Unity [1954]
·      XII. Freedom of the Pen [1954]
·      XIII. The Mainau Declaration of Nobel Laureates [1955]
Part III. Notes and Drafts
·      XIV. Morals in Legislation [1954]
·      XV. An Overture to Nehru [1955]
·      XVI. The 1955 General Election [1955]
·      XVII. Notes for the Press Conference at Caxton Hall [1955]
·      XVIII. Drafts of Resolution to World Conference of Scientists [1955]
              IV.29.    Volume 29. Détente of Destruction, 1955-57, ed. Andrew G. Bone.
                                                     i.  London: Routledge, 2005.
                                                   ii.  Contents:
Part I. The Prospect and Illusion Détente
·      1 Failure of the Foreign Ministers’ Conference at Geneva [1955]
·      2 The Dilemma of the West [1955]
·      3 Science and Human Life [1955, II.86.]
·      4 Nuclear Weapons and World Peace [1956]
·      5 How to Avoid Nuclear Warfare [1956]
·      6 Prospects for the Next Half Century [1956]
·      7 Prospects of Disarmament [1956]
·      8 Statement for Polish Radio [1956]
·      9 Nuclear Weapons [1956]
·      10 British-Soviet Friendship [1955-57]
a.   Message for a Meeting at the Stoll Theatre [1955]
b.   British-Soviet Friendship [1956]
c.    Welcome to Bulganin and Khrushchev [1956]
d.   Britain and Russia: What Now? [1957]
Part II. Autobiographical, Biographical and Philosophical Writings
·      11 Faith without Illusion [1956]
·      12 Why I Am Not a Communist [1956, I.46.]
·      13 My Recollections of George Trevelyan [1956]
·      14 Cranks [1956, I.52.]
·      15 Do Human Beings Survive Death? [1957]
·      16 Books That Influenced Me in Youth [1957, I.52.]
a.   The Importance of Shelley
b.   The Romance of Revolt
c.    Revolt in the Abstract
d.   Disgust and Its Antidote
e.   An Education in History
f.      The Pursuit of Truth
·      17 Some Changes in My Lifetime: Good and Bad [1957]
·      18 Gilbert Murray [1957]
·      19 Answers to Questions about Philosophy [1957]
·      20 Mr. Alan Wood [1957]
·      21 Reactions to Why I Am Not a Christian [1957]
a.   Christian Ethics (1)
b.   Christian Ethics (2)
c.    Why I Am Not a Christian (1)
d.   Why I Am Not a Christian (2)
e.   Earl Russell Replies
Part III. Suez and Hungary
·      22 The Suez Canal [1956]
·      23 Britain’s Act of War [1956]
·      24 The Act of Criminal Folly [1956]
·      25 British Opinion on Hungary [1956]
·      26 Message to the Indian Rationalist Association [1956]
·      27 The Atlantic Alliance [1956]
·      28 Message to The Hindustan Times [1956]
·      29 Message to Meeting on “Writers and the Hungarian Revolution” [1957]
Part IV. Justice in Cold War Time
·      30 Bertrand Russell Urges Parole for Jacob Mindel [1955]
·      31 Two Papers on Oppenheimer [1955]
a.   Michael Wharton, A Nation's Security
b.   The Scientist in Society
·      32 Four Protests for the Sobell Case [1956]
a.   The Sobell Case
b.   The Case of Morton Sobell
c.    Morton Sobell
d.   Message to the Rosenberg–Sobell Committee Commemoration Meeting
·      33 Symptoms of George Orwell’s 1984 [1956, I.46.]
·      34 Foreword to Freedom Is as Freedom Does [1956, I.59.]
·      35 An Open Letter to Mr. Norman Thomas [1957]
·      36 Justice or Injustice? [1957]
·      37 Anti-American Feeling in Britain [1957]
Part V. Nine “London Forum” Radio Discussions
·      38 Has the Left Been Right or Wrong? [1956]
·      39 The Importance of Nationality [1956]
·      40 The Role of Great Men in History [1956]
·      41 Is an Élite Necessary? [1956]
·      42 Is the Notion of Progress an Illusion? [1957]
·      43 The Immortality of the Soul [1957]
·      44 How Can We Achieve World Peace? [1957]
·      45 The Limits of Tolerance [1957]
·      46 Science and Survival [1957]
Part VI. “Nations, Empires and the World”
·      47 China, No Place for Tyrants [1955]
·      48 Letter to the Representative of IHUD [1955]
·      49 The Story of Colonization [1956]
·      50 Pros and Cons of Nationalism [1956]
·      51 Nations, Empires and the World [1957]
·      52 World Government [1957]
·      53 India, Pakistan and the Commonwealth [1957]
·      54 The Reasoning of Europeans [1957]
Part VII. The Next Step
·      55 Britain’s Bomb [1957]
a.   Britain's Bomb (1)
b.   Britain's Bomb (2)
·      56 Should H-Bomb Tests Be Continued? [1957]
·      57 Abstract and Script for a Radio Broadcast [1957]
a.   Next Step (Abstract)
b.   The Next Step in International Relations
·      58 Earl Russell and the H-Bomb [1957]
·      59 Population Pressure [1957]
a.   Population Pressure and War
b.   Population Pressures and Family Planning
·      60 Three Protests against Nuclear Testing [1957]
a.   Message to Be Read at the Meeting on April 30, 1957, of the National Council for Abolition of Nuclear Weapons Tests
b.   Letter from Bertrand Russell
c.    Statement for Meeting at Stanford University
·      61 Message to the First Pugwash Conference [1957]
·      62 The Future of International Politics [1957]
·      63 Britain and the H-Bomb [1957]
·      64 Scientific Power: To What End? [1957]
Appendixes
Interviews
·        I. East-West Relations after the Geneva Conference [1955]
·        II. Talking to Bertrand Russell [1956]
·        III. An Interview with Bertrand Russell [1956]
·        IV. Frayed Temper May Endanger the World [1956]
·        V. Lord Russell Says Russia Fears China Far More Than West [1957]
·        VI. Meeting with Russell [1957]
·        VII. Voice of the Sages [1957]
Multiple-Signatory Texts
·        VIII. Geneva: A Message to the Foreign Ministers [1955]
·        IX. Suez and World Government [1956]
·        X. Visiting Moscow [1957]
·        XI. Two Protests Against the Hydrogen Bomb [1957]
·        XII. Hungarian Writers on Trial [1957]
Miscellaneous Texts
·        XIII. Steps to World Government [1955]
·        XIV. China, geen oord voor tyrannen [1955]
·        XV. Eight Blurbs [1955-57]
·        XVI. Excerpts from Five Brain Trusts [1956-57]
              IV.30.    Volume 30. Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, 1957–59, ed. David Blitz.
                                                     i.  In Progress!
                                                   ii.  Contents:
Part I. Détente, Disarmament (International)
·     1 The Open Letters to Eisenhower, Khrushchev and Dulles [1957–58]
a.   Open Letter to Eisenhower and Krushchev [1957]
b.   A Reply to Mr. Krushchev and Mr. Dulles [1958]
·     2 World Government or World Annihilation? [1957]
·     3 Christmas Wish [1957]
·     4 East-West Negotiations [1958]
·     5 The Two Visions [1958]
·     6 Russell Speaks [1958]
·     7 Bertrand Russell on Negotiations [1958]
·     [7'] A Postscript to Portraits from Memory [1958]
·     8 Nuclear Dilemma [1958]
·     9 Two Unpublished Articles for Maclean's Magazine [1958]
a.   First Steps in Preventing Nuclear War [1958]
b.   How to Diminish the Risk of Nuclear War [1958]
·     10 "Central Question" [1958]
·     11 Mankind Versus the H-bomb [1958]
·     12 A Banned Congress [1958]
a.   Appeal to European Intellectuals [1958]
b.   Intended Address to Congress at Basle, 5 and 6 July, 1958 [1958]
c.    To the President of the Swiss Confederation [1958]
d.   Letter to Nebelspalter [1958]
·     13 Budapest Trials [1958]
·     14 A Plea for Mankind [1958]
·     15 Quemoy: The Price of Prestige [1958]
·     16 The Dangers of Nuclear Warfare [1958]
·     17 Balance of Nuclear Power [1959]
·     18 Mr. Nehru's Foreign Policy [1959]
·     19 Heroism? [1959]
·     20 India and Communism [1959]
·     21 Comments on the Open Letter to me from Professor Tetsuzo Tanigawa [1959]
·     22 Khrushchev's Disarmament Proposal [1959]
a.   Mr. Krushchev's Proposal [1959]
b.   Disarm. Plan Support Grows [1959]
c.    Peaceful Coexistence [1959]
d.   Disarmament: Is it Practicable? [1959]
Part II. The Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament
·     23 Steps to Nuclear Disarmament [1958]
·     24 Prefaces to Two Pamphlets [1958]
a.   Preface to Stop the H-Bomb Race [1958]
b.   Preface to Labour and the H-Bomb [1958]
·     25 CND and the United Nations Association [1958]
a.   A Message from Bertrand Russell [1958]
b.   Nuclear Disarmament [1958]
·     26 Nuclear Disarmament [1958]
·     27 Abundantly Justified [1959]
·     28 The Rocket Site Protests [1959]
·     29 Steps towards Peace [1959]
·     30 [Nuclear Disarmament] [1959]
·     31 Speech to the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, Manchester [1959]
a.   A Message from Earl Russell [1959]
b.   Notes for Address [1959]
c.    Address at Manchester, May 1st, 1959 [1959]
·     32 Lord Simon and the Nuclear Disarmament Campaign [1959]
·     33 The Purpose of CND [1959]
·     34 Speech for Trafalgar Squareю20 September, 1959 [1959]
Part III. Nuclear Testing
·     35 Political and Moral Leaders Comment on Soviet Suspension [1958]
·     36 Scientists Appeal to Premier [1958]
·     37 Letter to Prime Minister Macmillan [1958]
·     38 Why Bomb Tests Should be Stopped [1958]
·     39 The Unborn Victims of Nuclear Tests [1958]
Part IV. Science, Scientists and Peace
·     40 Address of Acceptance of the Kalinga Prize [1958]
·     41 Science and Coexistence [1958]
·     42 Mr. Marseille on Pugwash [1958]
·     43 My Address to Congress in Canada [1958]
·     44 The World is Round [1958]
·     45 A Blurb for and a Review of Brighter Than a Thousand Suns [1958]
a.   Robert Jungk, Brighter Than a Thousand Suns [1958]
b.   The Personal History of the Atomic Scientists [1958]
·     46 Should Men Go to the Moon? [1958]
·     47 Formal Address at Vienna 20 September, 1958 [1958]
·     48 Snobbery [1959]
·     49 Draft of Address to Pugwash Conference [1959]
·     50 Script and Recorded Statement for Seagram Symposium [1959]
a.   Five Minute Broadcast for the Scientific Symposium of the Seagrams Committee [1959]
b.   "The Future of Man" [1959]
·     51 Science and Peace [1959]
Part V. World Government
·     52 World Government [1958]
·     53 "Monopoly in War" [1958]
·     54 Letter to The Observer [1959]
·     55 Broadcast Given in German on the BBC German Service [1959]
·     56 Telegram to Newsweek [1959]
Part VI. Cold War Controversies
·     57 A Dispute with Emmanuel Shinwell [1958]
a.   The Right Grade of Deterrence [1958]
b.   The Nuclear Dilemma [1958]
c.    The Choices Before Us [1958]
·     58 Preventive War [1958–59]
a.   Nuclear War vs. Communist Domination [1958]
b.   Inconsistency? [1958]
c.    Bertrand Russell Reflects [1959]
d.   Straightening the Record [1959]
·     59 A Debate with Sidney Hook [1958]
a.   World Communism and Nuclear War [1958]
b.   A Reply to Dr. Hook's Rejoinder [1958]
·     60 A Dispute with C.P. Snow [1958]
a.   "Progress" [1958]
b.   Progress and the Bomb [1958]
·     61 Dr. Pauling's Visit [1958]
a.   Dr. Pauling's Visit [1958]
b.   Dr. Pauling's Visit [1958]
Part VII. Autobiographical and Biographical Writings
·     62 Lady Carlisle's Ancestry [1958]
·     63 Voltaire's Influence on Me [1958]
·     64 Gilbert Murray [1958]
·     65 Who's Who [1959]
·     66 War and Peace in My Lifetime [1959]
·     67 Odds and Ends about the War to End War [1959]
·     68 Family, Friends and Others [1959]
Part VIII. Philosophical Writings
·     69 Preface to the Collection of Freethought Broadcasts by M. Jean Cotereau [1957]
·     70 Headnote to Two Papers [1958]
a.   The World and the Observer (i) [1958]
b.   The World and the Observer (ii) [1958]
·     71 Law and Ethics [1958]
·     72 Messages to American Rationalists [1958]
a.   "Salute from Britain" [1958]
b.   "Salute from Britain" [1958]
c.    A Message to the Hon. Local Secretary from our President [1958]
·     73 Philosopher's Corner [1958]
·     74 A Reply to Mr. Charles Davy [1959]
·     75 The Expanding Mental Universe [1959, II.92.]
a.   Synopsis of a Suggested Article for the Saturday Evening Post [1959]
b.   The Expanding Mental Universe [1959, II.92.]
·     76 Letter to The Saturday Review [1959]
·     77 Russell's Religious Views [1959]
Part IX. Fictional and Humorous Writings
·     78 Two Nightmares [1959, I.52.]
a.   The Theologian's Nightmare [1959]
b.   The Fisherman's Nightmare or Magna Est Veritas [1959]
·     79 Catastrophe: Its Derivation [1959]
·     80 Reading History as It Is Never Written [1959]
·     81 Three Children's Stories [1959]
a.   The Post Office of Pinky-Ponk-Tong [1959]
b.   The Great God Zump [1959]
c.    Sir Theophilus Thwackum and Captain Niminy Piminy [1959]
·     82 The Right Will Prevail or The Road to Lhasa [1959]
·     83 Newly Discovered Maxims of La Rochefoucauld [1959, I.52.]
·     84 Two Parables [1959]
a.   Planetary Effulgence [1959, I.52.]
b.   The Misfortune of Being Out of Date [1959]
Appendixes
Interviews
·     I. Interview with S.W. Green [1958]
·     II. World's Choice: Peace or Annihilation in Next 50 Years [1957]
·     III. Premier Was WrongюLord Russell [1958]
·     IV. Leaders of Britain Applaud Bulganin's "Summit" Offer. They All Replied Yes [1958]
·     V. Bertrand Russell Still Is the Crusader at 85 [1958]
·     VI. Mike Wallace asks Bertrand Russell Is it Time for World Government? [1958]
·     VII. Interview with Kenneth Harris [1958]
·     VIII. "I'm Tired of Reds Using My Name" [1958]
·     IX. In the Direction of Sanity [1958]
·     X. A Visit with Bertrand Russell [1958]
·     XI. Three Interviews with Kingsbury Smith [1958]
·     XII. From This Great Mind ю This Provoking Thought [1958]
·     XIII. Press Conference [1958]
·     XIV. Small World [1958]
·     XV. Bertrand Russell at Home [1958]
·     XVI. Interview with Lord Bertrand Russell [1958]
·     XVII. Interview in the Beaver [1959]
·     XVIII. Interview on CBC (Elaine Grand)
·     XIX. Education for Survival [1959]
·     XX. Bertrand Russell Sees U.S., Soviet As Allies [1959]
·     XXI An Interview with the Rt. Hon. Earl Russell, O.M., F.R.S. [1959]
·     XXII. "Asian Club" "The Wisdom of the West" [1959]
·     XXIII. Bertrand Russell Conversations [1959]
Interviews by Correspondence
·     XXIV. Answers to the Two Questions Posed by Mr. Corsini [1958]
·     XXV. German Rearmament [1958]
·     XXVI. Letter to Mr. Josef Kadlec [1958]
·     XXVII. It is Not Yet Too Late! [1958]
·     XXVIII. Answers to Three Questions re Sleep and Dreams [1958]
·     XXIX. Answers to Questions by Evelyn De Wolfe [1958]
·     XXX. Answers to Nine Questions [1958]
·     XXXI. Letter to Soviet Russia Journal [1959]
Miscellaneous Shorter Writings
·     XXXII. Seven Assorted Blurbs [1958–59]
·     XXXIII. Messages to British Peace Groups [1958–59]
·     XXXIV. Messages to International Peace Groups [1958–59]
·     XXXV. Messages to Students [1958–59]
·     XXXVI. Messages to the United States [1958–59]
·     XXXVII. Messages to the Eastern Bloc [1958–59]
·     XXXVIII. Messages to Japan [1958–59]
Notes and Drafts
·     XXXIX. Religion and Science [1958]
·     XL. Two Drafts for CND Meeting, 5 May 1958 [1958]
·     XLI. Fragments of Two Stories [1959]
              IV.31.    Volume 31. The Committee of 100, 1960–62.
                                                     i.  Editor not yet assigned. 102 pieces available for selection. See the list here.
              IV.32.    Volume 32. A New Plan for Peace and Other Essays, 1963–64. Planned!
              IV.33.    Volume 33. The Vietnam Campaign, 1965–66. Planned!
              IV.34.    Volume 34. International War Crimes Tribunal, 1967–70. Planned!
              IV.35.    Volume 35. Newly Discovered Papers, editor as yet unknown.
                                                     i.  In Progress
                                                   ii.  Contents:
·     1 What Is Knowledge? [19??]
·     2 The Day of Judgment [1893]
·     3 The Strike at Arlingford [1893]
·     4 Staff Remuneration at Newnham [1908]
·     5 Preface to Philosophical Essays [1910]
·     6 The Reconstruction of International Intellectualism after the War [1915]
·     7 The Case of the Conscientious Objector [1916]
·     8 An Open Letter to Some Would-Be Friends of the Conscientious Objector [1916]
·     9 Preface to Mysticism and Logic [1917]
·     10 Institutions and Motives [1919]
·     11 [Response to Welcoming Speech to China] [1920]
·     12 [Mathematical Logic] [1921]
·     13 Foreword to the German translation of The Problems of Philosophy [1924]
·     14 Report to the Council of Trinity on Wittgenstein’s Work [1930]
·     15 [Authenticity and authority of English version of Wittgenstein’s Tractatus] [1960]
·     16 Private Memoirs [1956]
Appendices
·     I The Censorship of Plays [1908]
·     II Textual Notes from the MS for “Political Ideals” (Paper 56 in Papers 14)
·     III Textual Notes from a MS (Rec. Acq. 1410d) for “Bertrand Russell and the War Office” (Paper 70 in Papers 13)

              IV.36.    Volume 36. Indexes. In Progress.